Neurological Treatments

Schedule an Appointment: 702-796-8500

6410 Medical Center St Ste A-100 Las Vegas, NV 89148

In Office Neurodiagnostic Procedures

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test used to find problems related to electrical activity of the brain.

An EEG tracks and records brain wave patterns. Small metal discs with thin wires (electrodes) are placed on the scalp, and then send signals to a computer to record the results. Normal electrical activity in the brain makes a recognizable pattern. Through an EEG, doctors can look for abnormal patterns that indicate seizures and other problems.

Most EEGs are done to diagnose and monitor seizure disorders. EEGs also can identify causes of other problems, such as sleep disorders and changes in behavior. They’re sometimes used to evaluate brain activity after a severe head injury.

If a regular EEG is ordered the recording will last approximately 20 minutes after being hooked up.

If an EXTENDED EEG is ordered the recording will last approximately 1 hour after being hooked up.

If a 24 Hour EEG is ordered you will wear a recorder home and come back 24 hours later .

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD TESTING INSTRUCTIONS

A brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) test measures how your brain processes the sounds you hear. The BAER test records your brainwaves in response to clicks or other audio tones that are played for you. The test is also called a brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) or auditory brainstem response (ABR) test.

A BAER test can help to diagnose hearing loss and nervous system disorders.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD TESTING INSTRUCTIONS

This safe test evaluates the sensory pathway as an electrical signal travels from the nerve endings in the arms and/or legs to the brain. This test evaluates whether there is an interruption somewhere along the pathway. Tiny electrodes will be placed on your head and other areas of your body such as your neck, lower back, arms and legs. You will feel a mild electrical “pulse” for up to several minutes in each limb that is being evaluated. A computer will record the results as the nerves in your limbs, spinal cord, and brain respond to the stimulation.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD TESTING INSTRUCTIONS

This safe test evaluates the sensory pathway as an electrical signal travels from the nerve VEP is an acronym for Visual Evoked Potential. This is a test to determine the integrity of the nerve transmission from the eye to the brain. Electrode receptors are attached to the back of the head and various light stimuli are presented to the eyes and the response is monitored. It is useful to determine optic nerve and brain nerve transmission ability.endings in the arms and/or legs to the brain. This test evaluates whether there is an interruption somewhere along the pathway. Tiny electrodes will be placed on your head and other areas of your body such as your neck, lower back, arms and legs. You will feel a mild electrical “pulse” for up to several minutes in each limb that is being evaluated. A computer will record the results as the nerves in your limbs, spinal cord, and brain respond to the stimulation.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD TESTING INSTRUCTIONS

Vestibularnystagmogram (VNG) is a test that measures a type of involuntary eye movement called nystagmus.  These movements can be slow or fast, steady or jerky. Nystagmus causes your eyes to move from side to side or up and down, or both. It happens when the brain gets conflicting messages from your eyes and the balance system in the inner ear. These conflicting messages can cause dizziness.

You can briefly get nystagmus when you move your head a certain way or look at some types of patterns. But if you get it when you don’t move your head or if it lasts a long time, it may mean you have a disorder of the vestibular system.

Your vestibular system includes organs, nerves, and structures that are in your inner ear. It is your body’s main center of balance. The vestibular system works together with your eyes, sense of touch, and brain. Your brain communicates with the different systems in your body to control your balance.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD TESTING INSTRUCTIONS

What Is EMG?

Your muscles move when nerve signals from the brain tell them to get to work. Electromyography measures how well your muscles respond to those signals.

If the test picks up a problem, you may be diagnosed with what is called a neuromuscular disorder.

What Is NCS?

Nerve signals are electrical impulses that travel quickly throughout your nervous system. Sometimes, problems with the electrical activity in your nerves can cause pain, tingling, or weakness in your muscles.

NCS measures how fast and how strong the electrical activity is in a nerve. The test can tell whether a nerve has been damaged.

Electrical currents in your organs and tissue control many of your bodily functions. NCV and EMG record these electrical currents, helping physicians diagnose nerve and muscle problems. The NCV which measures the speed at which your nerves carry electrical signals, will be performed with the EMG, which analyzes the nerve impulses with certain muscles.

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD TESTING INSTRUCTIONS

Please download and print each of the patient forms and bring it with you at your next visit.